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London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) is a public research center which specializes in the history of London. LMA cares for and provides access to the historical archives of businesses, schools, hospitals, charities and all manner of other organizations from the London area. With 100 km of books, maps, photographs, films and documents dating back to 1067 in their strong rooms, LMA is proud to provide access to one of the finest city archives in the world - you could call it the memory of London.

London Metropolitan Archives users have a wide range of research interests, including family, community and local history, and they work with students, artists, producers and architects. However, you don’t have to have a specific reason to visit the LMA! If you’re fascinated by London you’re always welcome to drop in and browse the collections, you never know, you may uncover part of its lost history!

For more information on LMA’s collections and services please visit their webpages.

Terms of use

London Metropolitan Archives has graciously contributed images  from their collections to Shakespeare Documented, and retains sole ownership of said images. Visitors may link to and cite the images within Shakespeare Documented in personal research only. Any further use, including, but not limited to, unauthorized downloading or distribution of the images is strictly prohibited. Visitors must contact London Metropolitan Archives to request additional use, via email at: ask.lma@cityoflondon.gov.uk, or through the post at: London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London EC1R 0HB, United Kingdom

Documents contributed by London Metropolitan Archives

December 31, 1607
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
August 12, 1607
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
March 10, 1613
This is Henry Walker’s copy of the bargain and sale for the Blackfriars Gatehouse, signed by William Shakespeare and two trustees: William Johnson and John Jackson.